Scoundrels, Scalawags, and Sea-Thieves

I did a Medium post on fictional pirates. Feel free to read it. Modern kids think pirates are treasure-hunters in floppy hats. Just as Barney did with Mother Goose and fairy tales, pirates have been so watered down (excuse the pun) that modern kids don’t know pirates were thieves and robbers.

I wish Disney would make a movie of Andre Norton’s SCARFACE.

FAVORITE PIRATE MOVIES:

Captain Blood

The King’s Pirate (one of the few movies where the remake was better than the original.

The Crimson Pirate

The Sea Hawk

Treasure Island

Ann of the Indies

Swashbuckler

The Pirate

Bless my soul, sir.

Pat Buttram: Of Haney and Hound Dogs

My father met Pat Buttram once, as a boy in his father’s feed store.

(Travalanche)

Cornfed comic actor Pat Buttram (1915-1994) was known primarily for three things: 1) playing Mr. Haney on the sitcoms Green Acres and Petticoat Junction; 2) highly recognizable voice-overs in Disney animated features such as The Aristocats, Robin Hood, The Rescuers, and The Fox and the Hound; and 3) being the comic western sidekick to Gene Autry. One is tempted to claim his quavery, torturous voice as Buttram’s most distinctive feature, but it is equally easy to conjure his hound dog face with its conspicuous lazy eye.

Born Maxwell Emmett Buttram, he initially studied to follow in his father’s footsteps as a Methodist minister in his native Alabama. As a young person Buttram had performed in college plays and on his local radio station. He got his big break at age 18 when he attended the Chicago World’s Fair in 1933, where he was interviewed by a local…

View original post 365 more words

Towel Day

May 25, 2020, is Memorial Day in the USA, when we commemorate those who have fallen in their country’s service. It is traditionally celebrated by cleaning and decorating cemetaries, shopping for patio furniture, picnicking on the beach, eating hamburgers, hot dogs, drinking soda pop or pink lemonade. If you live in the right part of the country, you might have rhubarb pie for dessert.

May 25 is also Towel Day, the Glorious Twenty-Fifth of May, and Geek Pride Day. It is a day Hitchhiker’s Guide fans carry a towel in public and Discworld fans wear a sprig of lilac in honor of the late Sir Terry Prachett. It is also International Geek Pride Day. In addition, the first Star Wars film made its theatrical debut on May 25, 1977.

Today is also the day my second Space Force story, “Dick Dibble’s Birthday” is being published in Space Force: Building a Legacy. My first USSF story, “The Lizard-Men from Outer Space” will be published later this year in Tales of the Space Force. No date has been announced yet by the publisher, B Cubed Press.

If you live where rhubarb pie is common, you can probably obtain a sprig of lilac. (The two plants thrive in the same climate and like robins, are regarded as harbingers of Spring.)

Memorial Day, in the US, is considered the unofficial start of Summer. Schools are getting out for summer vacation. In Orange County, California [before the Pandemic and the Lockdown] Memorial Day weekend was the Orange County Highland Games, which my husband and I went to every year. It was also the date of an SCA War – Potrero War, I think, but not being an SCadian, I won’t swear to that, and Media*WestCon in Lansing, Michigan, a fanfic-centered SF con which I never attended, but long wanted to. Media^West was the convention that awarded the FanQ Awards for the best fanfiction written that year. Back when most fanfic was in fanzines, not on the Internet, most ‘zine publishers aimed for Memorial Day Weekend to release new ‘zines.

  1. Derecho a ser más friki. The right to be freaky.
  2. Derecho a quedarse en casa. The right to stay home.
  3. Derecho a no tener pareja y ser virgen. The right to be single and virgin.
  4. Derecho a no gustarnos el fútbol ni el deporte. The right to not like soccer or other sports.
  5. Derecho a la asociación friki. The right to Freaky/Geeky association.
  6. Derecho a tener pocos amigos (o ninguno). The right to few friends or none.
  7. Derecho a tener todos los amigos frikis que se quieran. The right to have all the Geeky friends you want.
  8. Derecho a no ir a la moda. The right to ignore fashion.
  9. Derecho al sobrepeso y a la miopía.
  10. Derecho a exhibir el propio frikismo.
  11. Derecho a dominar el Mundo.
[Image via Pixabay}
{image via Pixabay}

May 2020 Submission Challenge update

Raymond Daley is a bookmate of mine. He writes (and sells) a lot more stories than I do. Maybe this will help me catch up with him.

raymondwriteswrongs

All markets have now been checked. All are paying & open during May as far as I have been able to ascertain.

The rules are simple:- Try to sub a story to the market I’ve listed on the day I list it to be used. If you don’t wish to sub on that day or to that market, you don’t have to. In an ideal world, you’ll sub to all 31 markets and have 31 stories out. If you only want to sub 1 story during the month, that is totally fine! You don’t even have to use these markets, as long as you use a PAYING MARKET!

The private Facebook group was renamed, if you want an invite, message me via FB.

Feel free to get in touch with me on twitter @RayDaleyWriter if you are interested in taking part!


01 – Kanstellation https://www.kanstellation.com/submissions.html
02 – Abyss &…

View original post 284 more words

Space Force: Building a Legacy

What do Prometheus Award nominee Karl K. Gallagher, Dragon Award finalist Richard Paolinelli, and Darrell Award nominee Susan Murrie Macdonald all have in common?

A, they’re all writers who wrote speculative fiction stories good enough to be nominated for various awards, but not quite good enough to win those awards.

B, they and several other authors,( Doug Irvin (Editor) , P. A. Piatt , Susan Murrie Macdonald , Ali Abbas , Ray Daley , Rosie Oliver , Karl K. Gallagher , Brennen Hankins , Jim Robb , Brena Bock , Chris DiNote , Richard Paolinelli) will all have stories in Space Force: Building a Legacy. And Mrs. Macdonald, at least. is hoping to get a second Darrell nomination out of either her story in this volume or her completely unrelated story in B Cubed Press’ forthcoming Tales of the Space Force.

Tenere Altum. Hold The High Ground.

These are the stories of the first 100 years of the United States Space Force created by then U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Within this new anthology of military sci-fi short stories you will find stories of service and incredible sacrifice. Stories of the one sacrificing a few to save the many, and of the one sacrificing himself for all.

But mostly these are tales of the men and women to come, who will patrol the harsh, cold blackness of space. Those that willingly place themselves in harm’s way to protect a solitary blue marble and all that call it home.

Tenere Altum. Hold The High Ground.

These are the stories of the first 100 years of the United States Space Force created by then U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Within this new anthology of military sci-fi short stories you will find stories of service and incredible sacrifice. Stories of the one sacrificing a few to save the many, and of the one sacrificing himself for all.

But mostly these are tales of the men and women to come, who will patrol the harsh, cold blackness of space. Those that willingly place themselves in harm’s way to protect a solitary blue marble and all that call it home.

What is Space Force: Building a Legacy?

Tenere Altum. Hold The High Ground.

These are the stories of the first 100 years of the United States Space Force created by then U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Within this new anthology of military sci-fi short stories you will find stories of service and incredible sacrifice. Stories of the one sacrificing a few to save the many, and of the one sacrificing himself for all.

But mostly these are tales of the men and women to come, who will patrol the harsh, cold blackness of space. Those that willingly place themselves in harm’s way to protect a solitary blue marble and all that call it home.

Tenere Altum!

As previously explained in Krypton Radio, B Cubed Press’ anthology will mock President Trump’s decision to establish a sixth branch of the military without clearly defining its mission first. Midland Scribes Publishing appears to be taking a more serious tone to their volume, although some stories (including my own “Dick Dibble’s Birthday”) will lean toward humor. B Cubed Press was founded for the specific purpose of mocking the current resident of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, and exercising the ancient right of the powerless to laugh at the powerful and reminding them that the pen is and always has been/shall be mightier than the sword.

Space Force: Building a Legacy will have roughly a dozen near future stories. It will be released May 25, 2020 and cost $3 in e-book. I do not have price information for paperback editions, nor publication dates for Tales of the Space Force yet.

However, having college age offspring, I urge you to buy both books when they are available.

Eight Days a Week

I am attempting to learn Scottish Gaelic through Duolingo. I can’t write it yet, nor do I speak it well, but I can read about 200 words and phrases.

Scottish Gaelic

Dè an là a th’ ann?    (Jay ahn lah uh hown?) What day is it?

  • Didòmhnaich (ji-DAWV-nuch) Sunday
  • Là na Sàbaid (lah nuh SAH-bidj) Sunday
  • Diluain (ji-LOON) Monday
  • Dimàirt (ji-MAIRSHT) Tuesday
  • Diciadain (ji-KAY-den) Wednesday
  • Diardaoin  (jer-DOON) Thursday 
  • Dihaoine (ji-HOON-yeh) Friday
  • Disathairne (jee-suh-HARN-yeh) Saturday

View original post

Have You Ever Heard a Kora?

Have you ever heard a kora? Have you even heard of a kora?

I don’t think Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) would have destroyed Alasdair Fraser‘s Stradivarius violin or Eric Rigler‘s bagpipes. But they completely and utterly destroyed Ballaké Sissoko’s kora. Harper Lee said “It’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” Surely this falls into the category of mockingbird-killing.

Our federal employees at the border, ICE, TSA, CBP, already have a poor reputation here and abroad. Wanton destruction of musical instruments only adds to staining an already sullied reputation. Elizabeth Moon has complained about the damage to our national honor. This is nowhere near as bad as putting children in cages I wouldn’t put a flea-ridden dog in, but it’s certainly not good.

It’s been suggested on Twitter that had Mr. Sissoko been a foreign musician from Belgium or Norway, his instrument would have been safe. Or if the kora was an instrument the CBP agents were familiar with, they might have handled it more gently. Unfortunately, any nation that grants Rush Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom has an undeniable racism problem.

I can’t carry a tune in a bucket myself, but I have several friends who are musicians and they all dread travelling with their instruments, for fear the airlines will damage them. None of them ever mentioned a dread of CBP.

image via BBC

Do You Know What a White Cane Means?

a guest blog by Rebecca McFarland Kyle

This was written a few years ago by my friend, Rebecca McFarland Kyle.  We’ve had stories in the same anthology twice now. and will probably do so again.  She is severely visually impaired.

I thought everyone knew what a white cane was for, but apparently I was wrong.


National White Cane Day — October 15

Rebecca McFarland Kyle

originally posted October 15, 2011 at Bex Boox

In honor of National White Cane Day, I’m offering just a bit of an education. People who are using a white cane are either blind or visually disabled. I’ve used a white cane for ten years now and I’ve learned a lot from it and often as not been a teacher for people who’ve never encountered one before.

So what is a white cane and what does it mean? A white cane helps visually impaired or blind people get around.

They use the white cane for two reasons. One, it’s kind of like the “STUDENT DRIVER” sign you see on some automobiles. It tells you to beware and clear the road for someone who might perhaps not be as experienced as you are.

The second reason is to be able to navigate the world without having to be led by a person or a dog. Or worse, stumble around and bump into things. How does it work? The visually impaired or blind person holds the white cane in your hand and sweep or tap it in front of you. Essentially, that white cane is an extension of your index finger. You’re using it to more or less “feel your way around.”

First, if you encounter a person with a white cane, speak to them. Don’t be shy. This helps particularly the blind know where people are.

Second, you don’t need to yell. Generally, we hear pretty well. Sadly, that includes tacky remarks or jokes whispered to your friends.

Third, don’t point or use gestures. Many times we cannot see them or interpret them properly. Use your words: forward (for straight ahead), left, and right work great for directions.

Fourth, don’t expect the person with the cane to be “polite” and move it out of your path. They don’t see you there. If you’re not paying attention or expect the cane to be moved out of your way, don’t get abusive. You’re the one with the vision. Be glad you’ve got it and use it.

Fifth, allow people using white canes some space to navigate. They need to move the cane in front of them about two paces ahead and a bit more than the width of their body. If you see a person coming using a cane, keep your distance particularly with items that can foul up in the cane. Be particularly careful of pets and small children. We don’t want to harm anyone.

Sixth, teach your children about white canes. Uneducated kids thinking they can jump over the cane or play limbo with it is dangerous for both the cane user and the kid.

Seventh, if you need to lead a blind or visually impaired person somewhere, offer your arm. Walk slowly. Be aware of obstacles off to the side, overhead, and steps and just verbally tell the person what they’re getting into.

Blind and visually impaired people are not that much different than you. We want our independence, space and respect. The white cane helps us achieve that. I hope some of what I’ve said here while help my readers be more comfortable with people who use white canes.


Rebecca McFarland Kyle is an author and editor.  She was born on Friday the 13th, which explains a few things about her horror and fantasy stories.


Image via Google Images, from Joni and Friends

Mission Creep on the Original “Lost in Space”

I didn’t know Guy Williams was supposed to be the hero when I was a girl. I thought it was Billy Mumy’s show, and the rest were his supporting cast.

(Travalanche)

Having already done a post on Jonathan Harris, we thought it only equitable that we should publish our Lost in Space post on the birthday of Guy Williams (Armando Joseph Catalano, 1924-1989), who was the ostensible star of the show in the first place.

Now that Lost in Space has been rebooted, and not for the first time, the basic framework of the show may require but little explanation even among young people, but I bet some of the background is unknown even to fans of the original show. The concept was adapted from the Gold Key comic book Space Family Robinson, which launched (ha! I said “launched!) in 1962. The comic of course was a play on the concept of Swiss Family Robinson, only now instead of a 19th century family being marooned on an island, the story is set in the future (1997!), with a…

View original post 702 more words

Advent Word A Day Challenge

Armadale, on the Isle of Skye

My church is doing the Advent Word a Day Challenge. Advent goes from the four Sundays before Christmas to Christmas. It’s a time to (spiritually and mentally) prepare for Christmas.

December 1- Wait 14- Listen 2- Hope 15- Whisper 3- Breathe 16- Joy 4- Wake 17- Laugh 5- Step 18- Dance 6- Blink 19- Savor 7- Smell 20- Drink 8- Chew 21- Lift 9- Peace 22- Sing 10- Sleep 23- Love 11- Sit 24- Embrace 12- Touch 25- Born 13- Eat

  1. Wait. Advent is a time of waitful preparation.
  2. Hope. The first Advent candle is the Candle of Hope.
  3. Breathe. Just breathe, and remember to live life unrushed.
  4. Wake.
  5. Step
  6. Blink
  7. Smell
  8. Chew. Don’t gobble the holiday cookies. Chew and savor them.
  9. Peace
  10. Sleep. Get some rest. Don’t rush so much you can’t enjoy the holiday season.
  11. Sit
  12. Touch
  13. Eat. I am grateful for the charity turkey my church provided for Thanksgiving, which provided dinner for four days.
  14. Listen.
  15. Whisper
  16. Joy
  17. Laugh
  18. Dance. “Dance, dance, wherever you may be. I am the Lord of the dance,” said He. “I live in you and you live in Me.”
  19. Savor
  20. Drink. Hot cocoa and hot apple cider, maybe egg nog, not I Timothy 5:23.
  21. Lift
  22. Sing
  23. Love “The greatest of these is love.”
  24. Embrace
  25. Born “Unto us a child is born.
  26. Boxing Day
  27. 2nd Day of Kwanzaa.
  28. Instructions
  29. 1. Take some time to consider what the day’s word means to you. 2. Take a picture of something that represents the word and share it on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter using #TUMCadvent2019. 3. Be blessed by what others on the same Advent journey share. ***If you are not able to access the internet, or don’t want to take a picture, consider journaling the feelings and thoughts that the day’s word brings to you.